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3.3 Initial enquiry

An initial enquiry is any initial action taken by the local authority after it has received (or has itself identified) a safeguarding concern that has triggered its Section 42 duty (see Diagram 1a).

Wherever possible the concern should be resolved at this stage, however, where it cannot, further enquiries will be required.

 

When a conversation with the adult confirms cause for concern

Actions that could be agreed with the adult to address the safeguarding concerns at this stage may include:

  • Contacting services in the local authority or voluntary organisations for advice.
  • Discussion with or report to the police.
  • Talking to the organisation commissioning or providing care and support, for example, NHS, care home, housing provider.
  • Contacting the Office of the Public Guardian or Department for Work and Pensions.
  • Using a helpline or internet support.
  • Talking to the adult’s GP or other health professional.
  • Talking to the Care Quality Commission or other regulator.
  • Action that the local authority asks another organisation or agency to take to respond to the safeguarding concerns.

The conversation with the adult or their representative will agree the timescales for any action and who will take these forward.  This could be the adult, their representative, a practitioner from another agency or organisation, or an Enquiry Manager from the local authority.

 

Causing enquiries to be made by other agencies or organisations 

When the local authority requests another organisation or agency to take action to respond to a safeguarding concern this is known as ‘causing an enquiry to be made’. 

Causing an enquiry to be made is distinct from requesting actions from another organisation and must be clearly communicated. 

The local authority should agree the following with the adult and agency or organisation requested to undertake an enquiry:

  • The nature, scope and purpose of the actions or enquiry the agency or organisation is being asked to undertake.
  • The outcomes the adult is seeking from the actions or enquiry, how the adult will be advised of progress and the outcome, and who will be the lead professional responsible for communicating with the adult.
  • The timescale for the enquiry.
  • Who is responsible for monitoring, evaluating and reviewing the safeguarding or support plan for the adult or others, and evaluating the outcomes it is achieving. 

The local authority could request a number of different organisations to make enquiries depending on the nature of the safeguarding concerns and if there is more than one adult affected by these. 

The local authority retains accountability and oversight of the enquiry and outcomes – it cannot delegate its duty of enquiry under Section 42 to another organisation or agency.

 

Responsibilities of agencies or organisations asked to make enquiries 

Other agencies eg. health, the police have a duty to make enquiries when required by the local authority. 

Organisations and agencies asked to make enquiries by the local authority have a responsibility to take actions forward in a timely way, to feedback updates regarding progress, and if they decide they will not take the action or undertake the enquiry requested to advise the local authority of the reasons for this.

  

Deciding what an enquiry should involve (see Diagram 1b) 

Identifying possible further actions 

A range of organisations or agencies and approaches may need to be considered to address the on-going risks and safeguarding concerns. 

All work to respond to and address safeguarding concerns should be undertaken in line with the key principles for safeguarding and should maintain Making Safeguarding Personal as the central approach.

 

Co-ordinating responses and actions effectively 

An enquiry may require actions to be undertaken by a number of different individuals, practitioners or organisations and it is important that this is co-ordinated as effectively as possible, whilst maintaining a focus on the adult and the outcomes they want to achieve. 

Any conversations that relate directly to the adult or to decisions involving them must always include them or their representative or advocate.

 

Discussions or meetings with a co-ordination function that do not involve specific decisions about the adult 

Where discussions or meetings that are of a more general nature take place, the adult or their representative should always be advised of these, and records of action agreed or notes of the discussion or meeting should be made available to the adult or their representative should they wish to see them.

 

Decisions regarding the most appropriate response to a safeguarding concern (how an enquiry should be undertaken)

The decision making tree (Diagram 1a – Information Gathering) highlights appropriate pauses for reflection, consideration and professional judgment, and reflects the different routes and actions that might be taken.

Diagram 1a – Information gathering

 

 

 

If the issue cannot be resolved through these means or the adult remains at risk of abuse or neglect (real or suspected) then the local authority’s enquiry duty under section 42 continues until it decides what action is necessary to protect the adult and by whom and ensures itself that this action has been taken.

  

Principles for local decision making process:

  • empowerment: presumption of person led decisions and informed consent
  • prevention: it is better to take action before harm occurs
  • proportionate and least intrusive response appropriate to the risk presented
  • protection: support and representation for those in greatest need
  • partnership: local solutions through services working with their communities
  • communities: have a part to play in preventing, detecting and reporting neglect and abuse
  • accountability and transparency in delivering safeguarding
  • feeding back whenever possible

 

 

1b - part 1

 

1b - part 2

 

If the concern cannot be resolved through the above actions, or the adult remains at risk of abuse or neglect (real or suspected) then the local authority’s duty of enquiry under Section 42 continues until it decides what action is necessary to protect the adult and by whom, and assures itself that this action has been taken. 

 

 

Conversation with the adult

The conversation with the adult should seek to ascertain or confirm that:

  • The adult sees the issue as a safeguarding concern.
  • The adult feels in immediate danger or at risk, and what they want to do about this or what protective factors they have put in place themselves.
  • What action, if any, the adult wants taken.
  • What outcomes the adult wants from the safeguarding process.
  • Agree who will take the actions forward. This could be the adult, their representative, a practitioner from another agency or organisation, or the Enquiry Manager from the local authority.  See also: Roles and responsibilities.
  • Agree the timescales for any action to be taken and for the conclusion of the enquiry.

 

Addressing risks

Safeguarding planning should be ongoing and should begin at the outset of the safeguarding process.  Its purpose is to address any immediate and emerging risks as the enquiry progresses.  The adult’s wishes and views on the outcomes they want to achieve should be the leading and central consideration in safeguarding planning, although risk to others must be considered.

 

When the initial conversation with the adult confirms cause for concern

The conversation with the adult or their representative following receipt of the safeguarding concern will confirm if there is cause for concern or not.

If there is cause for concern, the outcomes the adult wants to achieve, and the action to be taken to address the safeguarding concern will be agreed with them.

Actions that could be agreed with the adult to address the safeguarding concerns at this stage may include:

  • Contacting services in the local authority or voluntary organisations for advice.
  • Discussion with or report to the police.
  • Talking to the organisation commissioning or providing care and support, for example, NHS, care home, housing provider.
  • Contacting the Office of the Public Guardian or Department for Work and Pensions.
  • Using a helpline or internet support.
  • Talking to the adult’s GP or other health professional.
  • Talking to the Care Quality Commission or other regulator.

 

Obtaining the adult’s consent to undertake an enquiry

Practitioners should wherever practicable seek the consent of the adult before taking action.  However, there may be circumstances when consent cannot be obtained because the adult lacks the capacity to give it, but it is in their best interests to undertake an enquiry.

Whether the adult has capacity to give consent or not, action may need to be taken if:

  • Others are, or will be, put at risk if nothing is done.
  • Where it is in the public interest to take action because a criminal offence has occurred.

It is the responsibility of all staff and members of the public to act on any suspicion or evidence of abuse or neglect and to pass on their concerns to a responsible person or agency.

 

 

Case study 6

 

BMA adult safeguarding toolkit:

 

“… where a competent adult explicitly refuses any supporting intervention, this should normally be respected.  Exceptions to this may be where a criminal offence may have taken place or where there may be a significant risk of harm to a third party.

 

If, for example, there may be an abusive adult in a position of authority in relation to other vulnerable adults, it may be appropriate to breach confidentiality and disclose information to an appropriate authority.

 

Where a criminal offence is suspected it may also be necessary to take legal advice.

 

Ongoing support should also be offered.  Because an adult initially refuses the offer of assistance he or she should not therefore be lost to or abandoned by relevant services.  The situation should be monitored and the individual informed that she or he can take up the offer of assistance at any time.”

 

 

 

Balancing the wishes of the adult and risks

The wishes of the adult are very important, regardless of whether they have capacity to make decisions about their safeguarding, or not. 

However, an adult’s wishes need to be balanced with wider considerations such as the level of risk, or risk to others including any children affected.

All adults, regardless of whether they have capacity or not, may want highly intrusive help, such as the barring of a person from their home, or a person to be brought to justice.  Alternatively, they may wish to be helped in less intrusive ways, such as through advice on the various options available to them and the risks and advantages of the various options.

It is important, when considering the management of any intervention or enquiry, to approach reports of incidents or allegations with an open mind.

When deciding how to respond to a safeguarding concern the following factors need to be considered:

  • The adult’s needs for care and support.
  • The risk of abuse or neglect to the adult.
  • The adult’s ability to protect themselves or the ability of their networks to increase the support they offer.
  • The impact of any intervention on the adult, and their wishes.
  • The possible impact of intervention on important relationships.
  • The potential of increasing risk to the adult.
  • The risk of repeated or increasingly serious acts involving children, or another adult.
  • The responsibility of the person or organisation that has caused the abuse or neglect.
  • Research evidence to support any intervention.

 

Where the adult does not want to pursue an enquiry and does not want the person or service thought to be the cause of risk contacted

Where an allegation or concern is raised and the adult has capacity to make an informed decision that they do not want this to be pursued or the person or service thought to be the cause of risk to be contacted, and no-one else is potentially at risk or affected, the adult’s wishes must be respected.

If there is a significant risk to the adult, consideration needs to be given to whether their wishes should be overridden.  This should not preclude professionals from fulfilling their responsibilities in relation to their duty of care regarding appropriate sharing of information in line with the requirements of the Data Protection Act.

If it is suspected that an offence may have occurred, this would need to be discussed with the police even if the adult has indicated they do not wish to make a statement, or to have the police involved, or the person or service thought to be the cause of concern to be contacted.  This should be approached sensitively and the adult should be advised of this.

Where there may be a risk to other adults or individuals, the adult’s wishes should be respected as far as possible.  Appropriate and proportionate action should be taken to ensure the rights and safety of others affected are secured.

If there are risks to others, the adult who does not want the concern to be pursued or the person or service thought to be the cause of risk to be contacted should be advised of any action it is felt is needed to be taken to ensure the rights and safety of others are secured.

Where it is not possible to make enquiries regarding an allegation or concern partially or fully due to the adult’s lack of consent, and there are concerns that others may be at risk, careful consideration should be given to what action should be taken, and how and to what degree the person or service thought to be the cause of risk can be offered an opportunity to respond to the concern or allegation.

Consideration should also be given to seeking advice from legal services regarding information that it is appropriate to share with the person or service who is thought to be the cause of risk, and / or other agencies that are responsible for safeguarding other adults who may be affected or at risk.

 

Where the person or service who is thought to be the cause of risk is an adult at risk of abuse or neglect themselves

Where the person or service who is thought to be the cause of concern is an adult at risk of abuse or neglect themselves, this requires an enquiry in line with these procedures but particular consideration should be given regarding how they will be supported during and following the enquiry process.

 

Reflecting the adult’s wishes in an enquiry

The adult should always be involved from the beginning of the enquiry, unless there are exceptional circumstances that would increase the risk of abuse.

What happens as the result of an enquiry should reflect the adult’s wishes, wherever possible, as stated by them or by their representative or advocate.

If the adult lacks capacity and they are not able to make the decision, any action should be in their best interests, and be proportionate to the level of concern.

 

Proactive approach to involving the adult

The adult and / or their representative must always be involved from the outset to completion of an enquiry.

In line with the Mental Capacity Act (MCA), there must be an assumption that the adult has capacity to make relevant decisions themselves, unless there is evidence by way of a capacity assessment that this is not the case.  Where there is evidence that the adult lacks capacity the Mental Capacity Act and Code of Practice should be followed.

During the enquiry, the Enquiry Manager and all practitioners involved in taking actions or undertaking enquiries, must actively seek to involve the adult and not erode their right to make choices and decisions for themselves.

If the adult has substantial difficulty in being involved, and where there is no one appropriate to support them, then the local authority must arrange for an independent advocate to facilitate their involvement.

It may be important for the adult to be away from the influence of the abusive individual or the setting to be as free from fear as possible, in order for them to be able to make as free a choice as possible about their wishes and what actions, if any, they want to be taken.

 

The local authority’s duty to involve the adult in decisions about them

Local authorities must involve adults in decisions made about them and their care and support, or where there is to be a safeguarding enquiry or a safeguarding adults review (SAR).

The local authority must help the adult to understand how they can be involved, how they can contribute to and take part in, and sometimes, lead or direct the process.

Adults must be active partners in the key care and support processes of assessment, support planning, review and any enquiries in relation to abuse or neglect.

No matter how complex an adult’s needs, local authorities are required to involve people, to help them express their wishes and feelings, to support them to weigh up options, and to make their own decisions.

As part of the assessment and the care and support plan, the local authority must have regard to the need to help protect people from abuse and neglect.

The local authority must assist the adult to identify any risks and ways to manage them, and to decide how much risk they can manage.

It should be remembered that choosing to make an ‘unwise decision’ does not mean that an adult lacks capacity.

 

Does the adult require an independent advocate?

At the beginning of an enquiry, the local authority has a duty to consider whether the adult requires an independent advocate to represent and support them in the enquiry.

An independent advocate should be provided to an adult who would have substantial difficulty in doing one or more of the following:

  • understanding relevant information,
  • retaining that information,
  • using or weighing that information as part of the process,
  • communicating their views, wishes or feelings,

and there is nobody else that is appropriate and able to represent them.

This should be kept under review as the enquiry progresses.

 

Duty to arrange an independent advocate

Where an adult requires an independent advocate, one should be arranged in the following circumstances:

  • For adults who are subject to a safeguarding enquiry or safeguarding adults review (SAR).
  • For all adults, as part of their assessment, care planning and care reviews.
  • For those in their role as carers.
  • For children who are approaching the transition to adult care and support, when a child’s needs assessment is carried out.
  • When a young carer’s assessment is undertaken.
  • To support a person’s involvement in an appeal, where appropriate.

 

An adult’s rights and freedom

The local authority must ensure that any restriction on the adult’s rights under the European Convention of Human Rights or freedom is kept to the minimum necessary and is proportionate to the risk of harm.

Restrictions should be carefully considered and frequently reviewed.

 

Conversations with the adult as part of an enquiry

If the person contacting the local authority about a safeguarding concern is not the adult, and is a professional or organisation, the expectation is that the individual providing this information will have had a conversation with the adult, wherever possible, regarding their consent, views, wishes and the outcomes they want to achieve from the safeguarding process.

The exception to this would be if the person contacting the local authority was unable to have a conversation because of concerns that it would have increased the risk for the adult.

There must be a conversation between the local authority and the adult at the earliest opportunity after a safeguarding concern is received or identified by the local authority.  The only exception to this would be if there are clear and evidenced concerns that to contact the adult at this point would increase the risk for them.  If this is the case, the local authority must find a way of having a conversation with the adult at the earliest point that it is safe to do so.

 

Considerations before having a conversation with the adult

In deciding the most appropriate way of having a conversation with the adult at this point the local authority must take account of:

  • The nature of the safeguarding concern and risks for the adult and others.
  • Other relevant information the local authority already has, or needs to obtain, in order to have a conversation without increasing risk for the adult and in order to respect their wishes (as far as they are known at this point).
  • The cause of risk, including the person or service thought to be the cause of risk.
  • The most appropriate way of contacting the adult, taking account of:
  • Any potential for this increasing risk for them.
  • How this can be achieved so there is an opportunity to speak with the adult free from coercion, or with support from someone they trust if they want or need this.
  • Who is best placed to have the conversation with the adult eg. someone they know, and where this should take place.
  • Any communication issues the adult may need support with.
  • Any mental capacity issues the adult may have, or support from an independent advocate if they are likely to have significant difficulty in representing themselves without this support.

 

Considerations in relation to safeguarding plans

Safeguarding plans should empower the adult as far as possible to make choices, and to develop their own capability to respond to risks.

Wherever possible, the adult should be supported to recognise risks and to manage them.

Where an adult lacks capacity to make decisions about their safeguarding plan, then a range of options should be identified which help the adult to stay in control of their life, as far as possible.

While the local authority’s Section 42 duty will have been discharged once it has determined that the adult has been protected and / or the actions required have been taken, it must ensure that the safeguarding plan remains monitored and under review.

 

Family or personal relationships

Any intervention in family or personal relationships needs to be carefully considered.

While abusive relationships never contribute to the well-being of an adult, interventions which remove all contact with family members may be experienced as negative interventions and risk breaching the adult’s right to family life under Article 8 of the European Convention on Human Rights where this is not justified or proportionate.

 

Balancing safety and other rights

Safeguarding needs to recognise that the right to safety has to be balanced with other rights: such as rights to liberty and autonomy, and rights to family life.

 

Safeguarding plans should consider a range of options (see: Legal remedies)

Action might be primarily supportive or therapeutic, or it might involve the application of civil orders, sanctions, suspension, regulatory activity, criminal prosecution, disciplinary action or de-registration from a professional body.

 

Records or notes of conversations and safeguarding meetings

A clear record or notes of what is agreed through these conversations should be kept.  A copy should be given to the adult, and consideration should be given to whether any partner organisations require copies.

It is the local authority’s responsibility to ensure conversations with the adult and any safeguarding meetings are recorded, and copies of these notes are given to the adult or their representative and other relevant individuals or organisations.  Due regard must be given to issues of confidentiality and the requirements of the Data Protection Act.

The adult or their representative should always be provided with appropriate feedback regarding any aspects of the enquiry that affect them directly or indirectly.  The adult should be given a copy of the relevant section of any notes which relate directly or indirectly to them, including when they choose not to attend a meeting.

 

Responsibilities of organisations or practitioners involved in an enquiry

All organisations or practitioners involved are responsible for:

  • Undertaking actions agreed with the adult, and any other actions identified.
  • Feeding back progress regarding actions taken to the Enquiry Manager in the local authority.
  • Discussing progress with the adult directly, where appropriate.
  • Notifying the Designated Adult Safeguarding Manager where this relates to a concern regarding a person working with adults (paid, unpaid or a student).

 

Concluding an enquiry

If the safeguarding concern or issue is resolved through actions agreed with the adult through the initial enquiry response, and the adult no longer remains at risk of abuse or neglect (real or suspected), the local authority’s duty of enquiry under Section 42 concludes.

If the issue cannot be resolved through these means, or the adult remains at risk of abuse or neglect (real or suspected), then the local authority’s duty of enquiry under Section 42 continues until it decides what action is necessary to protect the adult and by whom, and assures itself that this action has been taken.  This includes when the local authority asks another organisation or agency to undertake an enquiry.

 

Where the adult remains at risk of abuse or neglect through their own choice

Where possible, the local authority should agree with the adult how they are going to support them.

Where this is not possible, the local authority and other agencies must agree any ongoing actions relating to the safeguarding plan, underpinned by the Making Safeguarding Personal approach.

 

Where further enquiries are needed

Further enquiries are continuing actions taken to respond to safeguarding concerns that:

  • Cannot be resolved through the actions undertaken through an initial enquiry.
  • Where the adult remains at risk of abuse or neglect (real or suspected). Therefore, the local authority’s duty of enquiry under Section 42 continues until it has decided what action is necessary to protect the adult and by whom, and assures itself that this action has been taken.

 

Action taken as part of an enquiry

Action taken as part of an enquiry includes:

  • Action that the local authority takes.
  • Action that the local authority asks another organisation or agency to undertake to respond to the safeguarding concern (ie. the local authority ‘causes enquiries to be made’ by other agencies or organisations).

 

Causing enquiries to be made by other agencies or organisations

When the local authority requests another organisation or agency to take action to respond to a safeguarding concern this is known as ‘causing an enquiry to be made’.

The local authority should agree the following with the adult and agency or organisation requested to undertake action in response to a safeguarding concern:

  • The nature, scope and purpose of the actions or enquiry the agency or organisation is being asked to undertake.
  • The outcomes the adult is seeking from the actions or enquiry, how the adult will be advised of progress and the outcome, and who will be the lead professional responsible for communicating with the adult.
  • The timescale for the enquiry.
  • Who is responsible for monitoring, evaluating and reviewing the safeguarding or support plan for the adult or others, and evaluating the outcomes it is achieving.

The local authority could request a number of different organisations to make enquiries depending on the nature of the safeguarding concerns and if there is more than one adult affected by these.

 

The local authority’s duty when it causes enquiries to be made

The local authority retains accountability and oversight of the enquiry and outcomes – it cannot delegate its duty of enquiry under Section 42 to another organisation or agency.

 

Responsibilities of agencies or organisations asked to make enquiries

Other agencies eg. health, police, provider services, Care Quality Commission have a duty to respond to safeguarding concerns under the Care Act.

Organisations and agencies asked to make enquiries by the local authority have a responsibility to:

  • Take actions forward in a timely way.
  • Feedback updates regarding progress.
  • If they decide they are not going to carry out the action or undertake the enquiry, to advise the local authority of this and the reasons for this.
  • Feedback the outcome of their actions or enquiries to the adult.

 

When enquiries are completed

Once enquiries are completed, the outcome must be notified to the local authority.

The local authority should then:

  • Decide if the outcome of the enquiry is appropriate.
  • Decide if it is satisfied that the information provided by the organisation undertaking the enquiry is sufficient to discharge its duty under Section 42, or if it necessary to have a conversation directly with the adult in order to make this decision. In situations where the local authority decides a conversation with the adult is unnecessary, it must record the rationale for this decision.
  • Decide with the adult what, if any, further action is necessary and acceptable.
  • Record the reasons for deciding that its duty under Section 42 has been discharged.

The checklist for concluding enquiries should be used by all agencies.

 

Diagram 2 – Causing Enquiries to be Made

Dia 2

 

Generally, when enquiries are being undertaken in the person’s best interest, ie. under the Mental Capacity Act, this would be undertaken by the local authority.

 

What happens when actions have been completed?

 

Actions completed as part of an initial enquiry

Once the wishes of the adult have been ascertained and an initial enquiry undertaken, the local authority should have a discussion with the adult as to whether further enquiry is needed and what further action could be taken.

That action could include disciplinary proceedings, complaints or criminal investigations, or work by commissioners and CQC to improve care standards.

The discussion should enable the adult to understand what their options are and how their wishes might best be realised.  Social workers must set out both civil and criminal justice approaches, and other approaches that might help to promote the adult’s well-being, such as therapeutic or family work, mediation and conflict resolution, peer or circles of support.

In complex domestic circumstances, it may take the adult some time to gain the confidence and self-esteem to protect themselves and take action, and their wishes may change.

The police, health service and others may need to be involved to ensure the adult’s wishes are realised.

 

Outcomes and actions agreed with the adult as part of further enquiries

When further action is needed because the adult is deemed to be at continuing risk of harm, work will continue with them to develop strategies to reduce or manage the risks they are facing.

The outcomes achieved will continue to be evaluated with the adult as work progresses.  A safeguarding plan or actions will be agreed and reviewed with them, and timescales for future review and monitoring will also be agreed.

 

Recording actions on the adult’s support plan

One outcome of the enquiry may be the formulation of agreed action.  This should be recorded on the adult’s support plan.  It will be the responsibility of the relevant agencies to implement this action.

The support plan should set out:

  • What steps are to be taken to ensure the adult’s safety in future.
  • The provision of any support, treatment or therapy including ongoing advocacy.
  • Any modifications needed in the way services are provided (eg. same gender care or placement, appointment of an Office of the Public Guardian deputy).
  • How best to support the adult in any action they take to seek justice or redress.
  • Any ongoing risk management strategy, as appropriate.
  • Any action to be taken in relation to the person or organisation that is responsible for the abuse or neglect.

 

Identifying possible further actions required

A range of organisations or agencies and approaches may need to be considered to address the ongoing risks and safeguarding concerns.

All work to respond to and address safeguarding concerns should be undertaken in line with the key principles for safeguarding and should maintain Making Safeguarding Personal as the central approach.

 

Concluding an enquiry

When the safeguarding concern or issue is resolved and the adult is no longer at risk of abuse or neglect (real or suspected) the local authority’s duty of enquiry under Section 42 concludes.

 

Evaluating the need for any further action

When the adult’s outcomes have been achieved, the need for any other actions eg. advice, assessment, support planning will again be discussed and agreed with the adult.

The discussion should include risks that have been identified and action taken in relation to them, what has happened to the risk or what is expected to happen once the enquiry and agreed actions are complete, and whether the risk remains, has been reduced or removed.

 

Were the adult’s desired outcomes achieved?

At the conclusion of each enquiry the adult or their representative should be asked if their desired outcomes have been achieved fully, partly or not at all.

 

The local authority’s accountability for support provided

The local authority is required to record and report the outcomes of enquiries to the Department of Health, in particular the actions and outcomes achieved for the adult.  This includes:

  • Assessment of care and support needs.
  • Review of care and support needs.
  • If the adult moved to a different location.
  • If the adult was supported in managing their access to the cause of risk, or managing their finances.
  • Other kinds of support provided including regular reviews, referral for counselling support, or training.

 

Feedback to relevant people

At the conclusion of an enquiry the local authority is responsible for ensuring feedback regarding the outcomes of the enquiry is passed to all those who should receive it including:

  • The person thought to be the cause of risk.
  • The service thought to be the cause of risk.

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This page is correct as printed on Tuesday 22nd of August 2017 10:28:51 PM please refer back to this website (http://sussexsafeguardingadults.procedures.org.uk) for updates.
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